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Digital Art Commission 2012 Centre for Additive Layer Manufacturing & Exeter Phoenix

I was one of thirty artists/makers selected for the 2012 Exeter Phoenix Digital Art Commission.

Exeter Phoenix and the Centre for Additive Layer Manufacturing (CALM) are giving us the chance to make a piece of work using 3d printing technology.

 

 

Apple1

The image above and opposite are the starting points for the 3D sketchup model

Throat

"Throat"

 

Commissioned to make work for Centre for Alternative Materials and Remanufacturing Technologies (CALMARE)  using recycled materials for an exhibition in Exeter from 27th April to 22nd May 2015

Exhibition venue; EnviroHub, Devon Contract Waste on Marsh Barton http://www.dcw.co.uk/ 

Article in Exeter University magazine

 

I have used discarded aluminium drinks cans to make my work, which have been manipulated into an origami shape (the Fortune Teller).  These multiple shapes have been assembled using string to make a 3d structure.  The drinks cans are packaging designed to seduce.  The cans eventual state of dejection, its albeit brief history as receptacle and the variety of surface graphics appeal to me. I prefer where possible to use the throwaway object, life's detritus.  I make work that reflects craft traditions like knitting and sewing.  My work is processed based using ritualised methods to articulate ideas involving decay, renewal, consumption, repetition and change. 
When I think of global industry I think of quotes from Aldous Huxley's  “Brave New World”  “The more stitches, the less riches.”  And “Ending is better than mending”.  Production and consumption values need to change because the earth’s resources are not limitless.

 

Work in progress;

Angela,Read,Artist,Cans

"Cluster"

apple2

Prepatory drawing for 3D model

 

3dmodel

 

"Corrupt Apple"

Work in progress using Google Sketchup

 

 

Next Page

Death & Desire Series

 

 

Angela,Read,Artist,Cans

"Grid"

 

 

Details on request
readangela@hotmail.com

Facebook page

 

 

Column

"Column" work made for the CALMARE commission